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Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities 

Section II. Background Information and Methodology

Environmental Scan

Ohio's Labor Force Participation and Employment. The discrepancy between the employment rate for individuals with and without disabilities in the U.S. is mirrored at the state level in Ohio. According to the ACS, in 2016 35.1 percent of individuals with disabilities ages 16 to 64 in Ohio are employed compared to 76.4 percent of individuals without disabilities. These data reveal an employment gap of 41.3 percent between the two groups. Furthermore, only 21.7 percent of the total population of individuals with disabilities ages 21 to 64 were employed full time and year round, whereas 60.5 percent of the population without disabilities ages 21 to 64 were employed full time and year round in Ohio. This represents a gap of 38.8 percent. (Cornell University; http://disabilitystatistics.org)

ACS 2016 data indicate that 28.4 percent of working age Ohioans with a cognitive disability were employed compared to 25.9 percent nationally. OOD has continued its involvement in the Employment First partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) in delivering services to this population. In April 2015, DODD reported that 17,241 persons were employed in facility based workshops while 8,405 were employed in integrated employment settings. As of September 2017, 13,659 DD-eligible individuals had been served by OOD through the Employment First partnership with 1,436 gaining employment in an integrated setting.

Poverty and Earnings. Data regarding poverty are also collected through the ACS. A set of 14 standards are used to calculate poverty. Thresholds are based on family size and composition. In 2016, it is estimated that 30.1 percent of Ohioans with disabilities ages 21 to 64 were living in poverty as compared to 11.1 percent of individuals without disabilities (a gap of 19 percentage points). In 2016 the median annual earnings for Ohioans with disabilities who worked full-time and year round was $38,300 compared to $45,300 for individuals without disabilities who worked full-time and year round (a difference of $7,000). (Cornell University; http://disabilitystatistics.org)

Insurance and Health. According to the 2016 ACS, approximately 96.3 percent of Ohioans with disabilities ages 21 to 64 have health insurance (nationally, this rate is 90.3 percent). In comparison, 92.1 percent of Ohioans without disabilities ages 21 to 64 have health insurance. (Cornell University; http://disabilitystatistics.org)

 

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